Biocultural Community Protocol of the Camel Breeders of Rajasthan

The Biocultural Community Protocol of the camel breeders of Rajasthan puts on record the breeders’ our role as a local community embodying a traditional lifestyle that is relevant for the conservation and sustainable use of biological diversity. The breeders have stewarded and taken care of Rajasthan’s camel population for generations and their traditional knowledge and practices as well as customary rights are the foundation of Rajasthan’s camel culture and biodiversity. This protocol describes the traditional knowledge that they have used to manage Rajasthan’s camel population over the last few centuries but which cannot be taught through books, only through practical experience.

  • Title: Biocultural Community Protocol of the Camel Breeders of Rajasthan
  • Author: LPPS / Lokhit Pashu-Palak Sansthan / 2017
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    Añadiendo valor a la diversidad ganadera: Mercadotecnia para promover las razas autóctonas y mejorar los medios de subsistencia

    Sección 1: Lana y cachemira
    Sección 2: Carne y cueros
    Sección 3: Leche
    Sección 4: Análisis
    Muchas razas de ganado y especies menores autóctonas están en declive y corren el riesgo de perderse porque no pueden competir con las razas exóticas de alto rendimiento. La conservación de estas razas es importante: muchas poseen rasgos únicos, como la resistencia a enfermedades, que son vitales para la futura producción pecuaria. Una forma de ayudar a asegurar su supervivencia puede ser vendiendo los productos de estas razas a mercados especializados y de alto valor.
    El Plan de Acción Mundial sobre los Recursos Zoogenéticos reconoce la importancia del acceso a los mercados para el uso sostenible de la diversidad pecuaria y exhorta al desarrollo de mercados para los productos derivados de las especies y razas autóctonas y para el fortalecimiento de los procesos que agregan valor a sus productos.
    Esta publicación describe ocho ejemplos de comercialización de productos pecuarios (lana, cachemira, leche, carne y pieles) de las razas autóctonas de camellos bactrianos, dromedarios, cabras y ovejas en siete países de África, Asia y América Latina. Muestra cómo han mantenido las razas autóctonas en uso, contribuyendo a la vez al mejoramiento de los medios de subsistencia de los pastores dedicados a la cría de estos animales en pequeña escala.

    https://www.iucn.org/sites/dev/files/import/downloads/niche_marketing_spanish_1.pdf

  • Title: Añadiendo valor a la diversidad ganadera: Mercadotecnia para promover las razas autóctonas y mejorar los medios de subsistencia
  • Author: Evelyn Mathias and Paul Mundy / Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations / 2010
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    Marketing products from local livestock breeds: An analysis of eight cases

    Local breeds and minor species are hardy and able to thrive in harsh conditions. Their adaptive traits and unique characteristics (coloured wool or hides, extra-fine fibre, meat or milk with special tastes) offer opportunities for the marketing of speciality products and sustainable food production in marginal areas.
    This study discusses eight initiatives from Africa, Asia and Latin America that help communities to produce and market various products for niche markets: milk and dairy products from dromedaries; cashmere, wool and handicrafts from goats, sheep and Bactrian camels; and meat, meat products and handicrafts from goats and sheep.
    The main strategies were to seek new markets for existing or entirely new products (rather than trying to exploit existing markets). Most initiatives had some form of branding or labelling, and two had protected their products with geographical indications.
    Such marketing initiatives can be started with limited capital inputs but are skill and knowledge intensive. They require strong commitment to overcome seasonal fluctuations in production, the lack of infrastructure and services, and difficulties in institution building. But when well planned and carefully managed, they can help conserve breeds as well as provide a livelihood for people involved in the value chain, allowing actors earlier in the value chain – livestock keepers and small-scale processors – to capture a greater share of the value of the end product than they would by trying to serve a mass market.

    http://www.fao.org/3/i1823t/i1823t07.pdf

  • Title: Marketing products from local livestock breeds: An analysis of eight cases
  • Author: Evelyn Mathias, Paul Mundy and Ilse Köhler-Rollefson / Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations / 2010
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