The Karen commitment: Pastoralist/Indigenous Livestock Keepers’ Rights

Leaders of traditional livestock and pastoral communities, government representatives, civil society organizations with a focus on livestock genetic resources, academics and livestock researchers met in Karen, Kenya on 27–30 October, 2003. They issued a statement calling on governments and relevant international bodies to recognize the contribution of pastoralists to food and livelihood security, environmental services and domestic animal diversity and to conserving and sustainable use of animal genetic resources. They called for an international legally-binding recognition of inalienable Livestock Keepers’ Rights and the Rights of their communities.

  • Title: The Karen commitment: Pastoralist/Indigenous Livestock Keepers’ Rights
  • Author: LPP / League for Pastoral Peoples and Endogenous Livestock Development and Local Livestock for Empowerment (LIFE) Network / Intermediate Technology Development Group / 2005
  • Description: Leaders of traditional livestock and pastoral communities, government representatives, civil society organizations with a focus on livestock genetic resources, academics and livestock researchers met in Karen, Kenya on 27–30 October, 2003
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 1

  • Download document

    Engagement für Autonomie und Identität

    Eight-page colour brochure (in German) about LPP’s work to support pastoralists and promote livestock keepers’ rights.

  • Title: Engagement für Autonomie und Identität
  • Author: LPP / League for Pastoral Peoples and Endogenous Livestock Development and Local Livestock for Empowerment (LIFE) Network / 2003
  • Description: Brochure (in German) about LPP's work
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 8

  • Download document

    Losing livestock, losing livelihoods

    Although less talked about, the loss of biodiversity in domestic animals is even more acute than in crops, because the gene pool is already much smaller and because fewer wild relatives remain. Livestock conservation programmes have not been a priority and local breeds are continuing to disappear at an alarming rate. This neglect poses a serious threat to the global food supply and the millions of people who depend on domestic animals for their livelihoods.

  • Title: Losing livestock, losing livelihoods
  • Author: Susanne Gura and LPP / GRAIN / 2003
  • Description: The loss of biodiversity in domestic animals is even more acute than in crop
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 9

  • Download document

    Securing tomorrow’s food: Promoting the sustainable use of farm animal genetic resources: Issues and options

    Two breeds vanish every week, threatening herders and smallholders in marginal areas and the food security of us all. Why are we losing animal diversity? How to conserve diversity? What action is needed?

  • Title: Securing tomorrow's food: Promoting the sustainable use of farm animal genetic resources: Issues and options
  • Author: LPP / League for Pastoral Peoples and Endogenous Livestock Development and Local Livestock for Empowerment (LIFE) Network / 2002
  • Description: Two breeds vanish every week, threatening herders and smallholders in marginal areas and the food security of us all
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 4

  • Download document

    Securing tomorrow’s food: Promoting the sustainable use of farm animal genetic resources: Information for action

    Farm animal diversity is vanishing at an alarming rate. As industrial livestock production expands, it is relying on fewer and fewer breeds. Already, 15% of the world’s livestock and poultry breeds are extinct, and another 35% are endangered. We are coming to depend on a livestock population with a dangerously narrow genetic base: because of their genetic uniformity, huge numbers of animals could be wiped out by a new disease.
    Locally adapted animal breeds carry genetic material of immense value. These breeds must be conserved. The only realistic way to do so is by maintaining the production systems they are part of – by supporting the small farmers and pastoralists who manage these animals.
    This dossier is intended for decision-makers and field staff from governmental and non-governmental institutions and organisations working on agriculture, livestock production, natural resources management, food security and other aspects of rural development in the South. The goal is to stimulate policy makers, project staff and members of grassroots organisations to support in their policies and actions the sustainable use and community-based management of farm animal breeds.

  • Title: Securing tomorrow's food: Promoting the sustainable use of farm animal genetic resources: Information for action
  • Author: LPP / League for Pastoral Peoples and Endogenous Livestock Development and Local Livestock for Empowerment (LIFE) Network / 2002
  • Description: http://www.pastoralpeoples.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Securing_tomorrows_food.pdf
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 94

  • Download document