Local livestock for empowerment: The LIFE Network

Imagine if all cows were black and white… if all the pigs were pink… if every sheep, and every chicken, were white…
This booklet draws attention to the threat to local livestock breeds, and describes what the Local Livestock for Empowerment (LIFE) Network is doing to help pastoralists and small-scale livestock keepers to maintain them.

  • Title: Local livestock for empowerment: The LIFE Network
  • Author: LIFE Network / LIFE Network / 2010
  • Description: Imagine if all cows were black and white... if all the pigs were pink... if every sheep, and every chicken, were white...
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 16

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    Livestock Keepers’ Rights: A rights-based approach to invoking justice for pastoralists and biodiversity conserving livestock keepers

    Adapted livestock breeds enable their keepers to take advantage of common property resources. They are an important resource for maintaining food security in remote areas and in the adaptation to climate change. To ensure their long-term survival, the livestock keepers who have bred and nurtured these breeds need a bundle of rights that enable them to continue keeping these breeds and make a living from them. Players in livestock development should support the struggle of the livestock keepers for recognition during the negotiations at various international forums. This article summarizes the three principles and five rights that make up Livestock Keepers’ Rights.

  • Title: Livestock Keepers’ Rights: A rights-based approach to invoking justice for pastoralists and biodiversity conserving livestock keepers
  • Author: Ilse Köhler-Rollefson and Evelyn Mathias / Policy Matters / 2010
  • Description: Adapted livestock breeds enable their keepers to take advantage of common property resources
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 3

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    Bio-cultural Community Protocols, starting point for endogenous livestock development?

    A biocultural protocol is a document that records a community’s role in ecosystem management, and states its rights to benefit from the ecosystem. Several groups of livestock keepers have created biocultural protocols describing their animal breeds and their indigenous knowledge about their breeds.

  • Title: Bio-cultural Community Protocols, starting point for endogenous livestock development?
  • Author: Ilse Köhler-Rollefson / Endogenous Development Magazine / 2010
  • Description: A biocultural protocol is a document that records a community's role in ecosystem management, and states its rights to benefit from the ecosystem
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 32

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    Biocultural community protocols for livestock keepers

    Biocultural community protocols are a new approach with great potential for empowering pastoralists and other traditional livestock-keeping communities. They are both a process and a document in which communities invoke their rights as guardians of biological diversity under Article 8j of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity. Claiming rights for in-situ conservation, they also help promote Livestock Keepers’ Rights to maintain their breeds and continue their traditional management practices.
    Biocultural community protocols put on record traditional knowledge and the biodiversity that communities steward, in a process that the communities themselves drive. In developing a biocultural community protocol, communities become informed about national and international laws that protect their rights. This book provides an overview of the process as well as its legal background and describes the first experiences with implementing this approach by livestock keepers in Asia and Africa.

  • Title: Biocultural community protocols for livestock keepers
  • Author: LPP and LIFE Network / Endogenous Development Magazine / 2010
  • Description: A biocultural protocol is a document that records a community's role in ecosystem management, and states its rights to benefit from the ecosystem
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 42

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    Marketing products from local livestock breeds: An analysis of eight cases

    Local breeds and minor species are hardy and able to thrive in harsh conditions. Their adaptive traits and unique characteristics (coloured wool or hides, extra-fine fibre, meat or milk with special tastes) offer opportunities for the marketing of speciality products and sustainable food production in marginal areas.
    This study discusses eight initiatives from Africa, Asia and Latin America that help communities to produce and market various products for niche markets: milk and dairy products from dromedaries; cashmere, wool and handicrafts from goats, sheep and Bactrian camels; and meat, meat products and handicrafts from goats and sheep.
    The main strategies were to seek new markets for existing or entirely new products (rather than trying to exploit existing markets). Most initiatives had some form of branding or labelling, and two had protected their products with geographical indications.
    Such marketing initiatives can be started with limited capital inputs but are skill and knowledge intensive. They require strong commitment to overcome seasonal fluctuations in production, the lack of infrastructure and services, and difficulties in institution building. But when well planned and carefully managed, they can help conserve breeds as well as provide a livelihood for people involved in the value chain, allowing actors earlier in the value chain – livestock keepers and small-scale processors – to capture a greater share of the value of the end product than they would by trying to serve a mass market.

    http://www.fao.org/3/i1823t/i1823t07.pdf

  • Title: Marketing products from local livestock breeds: An analysis of eight cases
  • Author: Evelyn Mathias, Paul Mundy and Ilse Köhler-Rollefson / Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations / 2010
  • Description: Local breeds and minor species are hardy and able to thrive in harsh conditions
  • Format: Zip
  • Pages: 14

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